This section excerpts a few of the reports or policy briefs that have been especially influential in shaping thinking on the gig economy. Many of the documents listed below were produced by the entities linked in the “Organizations & Databases” category. However, these documents are in no way exhaustive of research and writing on the gig economy that exists outside the academy, which is both broad and deep.

Eisenbrey, Ross and Lawrence Mishel. “Uber Business Model Does Not Justify a New ‘Independent Worker’ Category.” Economic Policy Institute Report (March 17, 2016). Read Here

Mishel, Lawrence. “Despite Freelancers Union/Upwork Claim, Freelancing is Not Becoming Americans’ Main Source of Income.” Economic Policy Institute Briefing Paper #415 (December 9, 2015). Read Here

Mishel, Lawrence. “Claims of an Exploding Gig Economy Are Contradicted by the Lack of Growth of Self-Employed Workforce.” Economic Policy Institute Economic Snapshot (October 28, 2015). Read Here

Mishel, Lawrence. “Social Security Data Confirms Same Old Pattern: Self Employment Headcount Has Risen but Economic Impact Remains Small.” Economic Policy Institute Working Economics Blog (June 28, 2015). Read Here

Mishel, Lawrence and Julia Wolfe. “Nonemployer Establishments Grew in 2016 but their Real Revenues Were Stable: This confirms Other Data on Self Employment Showing More Activity, but Little Economic Impact.” Economic Policy Institute Working Economics Blog (June 21, 2018). Read Here

Mishel, Lawrence. “How Big is AI-Related Employment? Not that Big at All – Despite What Stanford’s AI Index Annual Report Tries to Claim.” Economic Policy Institute Working Economics Blog (June 14, 2018). Read Here

Mishel, Lawrence. “Uber and the Labor Market: Uber Drivers’ Compensation, Wages, and the Scale of Uber and the Gig Economy.” Economic Policy Institute Report (May 15, 2018). Read Here

Mishel, Lawrence. “Getting Beyond the Hype About Uber and Gig Work.” National League of Cities CitiesSpeak (July 26, 2018). Read Here